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The Only 11 Supplies You Need to Start Cooking in the Classroom

Any day that we cook in the classroom is my students’ favorite day of the week.

Not only are we having fun and working together, but we are practicing and incorporating key life skills: social skills, fine motor practice, cooking, following directions and the steps of a task, patience and wait time, basic math

Supplies for cooking in the classroom. The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

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During the middle of my first year as a self-contained special needs teacher, we began implementing Fun Food Friday (read about it here). And we haven’t looked back.

But getting started wasn’t the easiest of tasks because I started from scratch.

We had no classroom supplies except for a classroom microwave and a classroom fridge. We had no recipes to follow, and figuring out what kitchen items we needed most was trial and error.

Over the last 3 years, our classroom has come to love cooking and there are a few key kitchen items that we would not be able to function without when we cook.

The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

Supplies for cooking in the classroom. The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

Silverware – One thing I wish I had invested in sooner was a nice set of silverware. Plastic cutlery is a great resource to have, but sometimes you need sturdier utensils. No need to spend a lot of money. You can find cheap sets of silverware for under $20.

Silicone Spatulas – a set of 3 spatulas is best. You never know when you need one, and having more than one allows for sharing of responsibility when cooking.

Mixing Spoons – you’ll want to have a couple of mixing spoons on hand, not only for sharing, but for recipes that involve multiple bowls. They’re inexpensive too, you can spoons for about $1 a piece.

Slotted Spatula – from my experience, you only need 1. If comes in handy when you’re dishing out servings of some recipes. Other than that, you won’t need one.

  • Whisk – you will use a whisk more often times than you’d like. Not a starting out necessity, but definitely something to add to the collection after getting started.

The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

Rectangular Baking Pan with Lid – we use this pan A LOT, and having a lid makes it so easy to save any leftovers for snack the next day.

Cookie Sheet – while we use the rectangular pan more, sometimes having a cookie sheet is a great alternative. Definitely a little cheaper, but not a necessity if you have the baking pan.

  • You can also invest in the AmazonBasics baking set, which comes with 6- must have baking basics for $16. It gives you everything you’ll need.

The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

Supplies for cooking in the classroom. The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

Mixing Bowls – a nice set of mixing bowls will make or break your cooking lessons. Invest in a set that has grips on the bottom to help keep the bowls stationary on the table.

Measuring Spoons – a set with large numbers on the handles works great in the classroom as the numbers are easier to read and identify. This color coded set of measuring spoons is made just for little chefs.

Measuring Cups – a set with large numbers on the handles works great in the classroom as they are easier to read and identify. This color coded set of measuring cups is made just for little chefs.

  • Dish Rack – not a necessity, but something else we picked up along the way when we were ready to start washing dishes after we cooked. You’ll also need dish soap and scrubbies.

The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

Supplies for cooking in the classroom. The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

Plastic Cutlery – we use these most of the time, especially when we are passing out our recipe to other teachers in the building.

Paper Plates – most of the time we use paper towels on the table when we eat snack, but it’s nice to have some paper plates around when we make “messier” recipes.

Foil / Wax Paper – instead of using a cookie sheet or baking pan, sometimes using foil or wax paper is a better option. Students can have their own piece too.

Baggies – snack sizes work great for passing out recipes to other teachers in the building. You can even staple on little notes from the kids, incorporating writing into the cooking curriculum.

The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

Supplies for cooking in the classroom. The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

Year Bundle of No Bake Visual Recipes – My favorite thing about these recipes is that they use real pictures of each step of the recipe and not clip art. It’s almost essential for many of our students to have an activity be as life-like as possible for them to learn to generalize.

There are 5 different no bake, visual recipes per month. Use this bundle of recipes to cook with your students in the classroom, foster those super important life skills, and work on those IEP goals and objectives… all at the same time!

You can also try out this free duo of visual recipes before purchasing.

The only kitchen supplies and essentials you need to start cooking in your classroom. A simple cooking supply list to get started, including visual recipes. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner

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I'm a special education teacher, presenter, curriculum writer, and educational blogger behind Mrs. D's Corner.
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